On the shelf

What Tufts authors are writing about

Before
Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martinís Press, May 2007
Joseph Hurka, lecturer in English

Over one night in September, this novel offers up the strange and secret lives of residents of a small street in Cambridge, Mass. Jiri Posselt and his wife, Anna, are survivors of the Nazi horror in Czechoslovakia; they have befriended a neighbor, Tika LaFond, a college student who has faced great challenges of her own. As night descends, readers meet another character, a man who enters the apartments of neighborhood women when they arenít home, taking a peculiar inventory of their lives. Whether theyíre strangers, acquaintances, or ultimately closest allies, these characters fascinate and terrify. Hurkaís previous book, Fields of Light: A Son Remembers His Heroic Father, published in paperback in 2003, won the Pushcart Editorsí Book Award.



Clinical Manual of Geriatric Psychopharmacology
American Psychiatric Press Inc., 2007
Co-author, Ronald W. Pies, clinical professor of psychiatry, Tufts School of Medicine

Written for residents, fellows and clinicians in psychiatry and medicine who diagnose and treat psychiatric and neuropsychiatric conditions that can affect older patients, this clinical reference can be used across all treatment settings for the elderly. This book “should find its way to the shelf of every psychiatrist, and perhaps every geriatrician, working with older adults,” writes Dr. Dan G. Blazer, the JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center and former president of the American Geriatrics Society and the American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry.


Marc Chagall
Schocken/Nextbook, March 2007
Jonathan Wilson, professor of English

Novelist and critic Jonathan Wilson clears away the sentimental mists surrounding an artist whose career spanned two world wars, the Russian Revolution, the Holocaust and the birth of the State of Israel. Marc Chagall’s work addresses these transforming events, but his ambivalence about his role as a Jewish artist adds an intriguing wrinkle to common assumptions about his life. Drawn to sacred subject matter, Chagall remains defiantly secular in outlook. Determined to “narrate” the miraculous and tragic events of the Jewish past, he frequently chooses Jesus as a symbol of martyrdom and sacrifice. Wilson’s book demonstrates how Chagall’s life constitutes a grand canvas on which much of 20th-century Jewish history is vividly portrayed. Fleeing Paris steps ahead of the Nazis, Chagall arrived in New York in 1941. Drawn to Israel, but not enough to live there, Chagall grappled endlessly with both a nostalgic attachment to a vanished past and the magnetic pull of an uninhibited secular present. Wilson’s portrait of Chagall is altogether more historical, more political and edgier than conventional wisdom would have us believe—showing us how Chagall is the emblematic Jewish artist of the 20th century.


Puppy’s First Steps: The Whole Dog Approach to Raising a Happy, Healthy, Well-Behaved Puppy
Houghton-Mifflin, April 2007
Edited by Nicholas Dodman, director of the Animal Behavior Program, Cummings School

Move over Monks of New Skete. Sit down Cesar Millan. Your theories are outmoded and not universally supported by science. Puppy’s First Steps is a comprehensive, accessible and humane guide to puppies from one of the world’s premiere veterinary schools. Nowhere else will readers find this whole-dog approach—a unique combination of training, behavior and health care. Based on cutting-edge research, real day-to-day clinical experience and unparalleled expertise, the faculty of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, led by Dodman, the renowned animal behaviorist, provides the very best information on the health and behavior of puppies. Covering everything from how to pick a puppy, what to feed him and how to housetrain, to why puppies behave the way they do and what to do in a host of medical situations, Puppy’s First Steps is the only book a puppy owner will need.

This article appeared in the Tufts Journal in May 2007.