Saturday, December 3, 2016

September 2010 People Notes

Jessica Dym Bartlett, a doctoral student in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Development, has been selected as a doctoral fellow by the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood. The award, one of only four in the country, supports up to two years of dissertation research, and is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood.

Jerold Bell, associate clinical professor at the Cummings School, presented two lectures at the World Small Animal Veterinary Association conference in Geneva, Switzerland, on June 3: “Facing Breed-related Diseases as a Vet—Practical and Ethical Aspects” and “Genetic Testing and Genetic Counseling in Pet and Breeding Dogs.”

Joanne Berger-Sweeney became dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and a professor of biology on August 23. A graduate of Wellesley College, she received an M.P.H. in environmental health sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in neurotoxicology from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Following her graduate training, she worked for two years at the Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale. Berger-Sweeney’s research focuses on the neurobiology of learning and memory and includes behavioral, neurochemical and anatomical studies. She joined the faculty at Wellesley College in 1991, was the Allene Lummis Russell Professor in Neuroscience and was named associate dean of the college in 2004. From 2004 to 2006, she was director of the Neurosciences Program at Wellesley, where she helped spearhead the creation of an interdisciplinary neuroscience major. She has been a member of the editorial board of Behavioral Neuroscience, the behavioral neuroscience review panel of the National Science Foundation and an NIH study section panel. Between 1995 and 2006, she directed the Society for Neuroscience’s Minority Neuroscience Fellowship Program, a federally funded training grant that provides pre-doctoral and postdoctoral fellowships to underrepresented minorities engaging in neuroscience research.

Remco Chang joined the School of Arts and Sciences as an assistant professor of computer science in September. He received a B.S. from Johns Hopkins University in 1997, an M.S. from Brown University in 2000 and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 2009. Prior to his Ph.D., he worked for Boeing developing real-time flight tracking and visualization software, followed by a position at UNC-Charlotte as a research scientist. While at UNC, Remco became involved in establishing and developing the field of visual analytics, a new discipline in computer science that combines interactive visualization with automated methods to analyze large and complex data. His current research is supported by the Department of Homeland Security and the National Science Foundation, and includes urban modeling, computer graphics, information visualization and visual analytics.

Art Donohue-Rolfe has been appointed chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Donohue-Rolfe, who received a Ph.D. from the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences in 1979, joined the veterinary school in 1993 as an associate professor in the division of infectious diseases; since 2005 he has served as acting or interim chair of biomedical sciences. His broad research interest is the pathogenesis of enteric, bacterial infections. He was a major contributor to the early elucidation of the structural, biochemical, functional and enzymatic characterization of the family of Shiga toxins produced by enterohemorrhagic E. coli.

Kevin P. Gallagher, a senior researcher at the Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE), has been appointed to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Advisory Committee for environment and trade issues in North America for a two-year term. Gallagher’s article “The China Syndrome” appeared in the August 12 issue of Latin Trade.

Grant Garven, professor of geology and adjunct professor in civil and environmental engineering, received the A.I. Levorsen Memorial Award from the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Pacific section, for a paper he presented at the group’s meeting in May on “A Geohydrodynamic Study of the Role of Faults on Petroleum Migration in the California Borderland Basins,” co-authored with Byeongju Jung, E12, and James Boles. The Levorsen Award recognizes the best paper presented at a meeting, with emphasis on creative thinking about new ideas in exploration.

Elizabeth “Beth” Gillis has joined the Office of Development and Alumni Relations at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine as a staff assistant. Previously she held an administrative position at the Seven Hills Charter Public School in Worcester, Mass., and had earlier worked as the development assistant and membership coordinator at the Worcester County Horticultural Society.

David Hammer has rejoined Tufts as a professor of education in the School of Arts and Sciences, coming from the University of Maryland, where he was a professor of physics and curriculum and instruction and served as coordinator of the Science Teaching Center. He received tenure at Tufts earlier in his career before moving to Maryland. Hammer received an M.A. in physics in 1987 and a Ph.D. in science and mathematics education in 1991 from the University of California, Berkeley. He has published numerous articles in refereed journals and has several more articles in press. In 2006, he published the book Seeing the Science in Children’s Thinking: Case Studies of Elementary Student Inquiry in Physical Science (Heinemann). He is an associate editor of the Journal of the Learning Sciences and on the editorial review board for Science Education. He has received extensive funding from the National Science Foundation, including a current $500,000 grant on which he is co-principal investigator, “Improving Students’ Mathematical Sense-making in Engineering: Research and Development.” Hammer will have a secondary appointment in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.

Jonathan Harris, director of the Theory and Education Program at the Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE), presented a paper on “The Macroeconomics of Development without Throughput Growth” at the 2010 conference of the International Society for Ecological Economics at the University of Oldenburg, Germany, on August 23.

Deborah Kochevar, dean of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, has been named Outstanding Woman Veterinarian of the Year for 2010 by the Association for Women Veterinarians Foundation. Kochevar has received numerous teaching awards and has served as chair of the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education and the Educational Commission for Foreign Veterinary Graduates.

Susan Koegel has joined the School of Arts and Sciences as a lecturer in biology. She earned a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences/immunology from the University of California, San Francisco in 2007. At UCSF, she studied basic molecular mechanisms of T cell activation and lymphocyte cell signaling. Since then, she has been a visiting assistant professor of biology at Williams College and a curriculum fellow at Harvard Medical School, where she developed a new cancer biology Ph.D. concentration, as well as a new course in molecular pathology of cancer. Koegel received the Barry M. Goldwater Award in 2001 and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship from 2003 to 2006.

Amy Maher is the new administrator to the dean in the School of Engineering. She will work with Dean Linda Abriola on high-level administrative tasks and projects. Maher previously was assistant to the dean at the Harvard Divinity School and later served as academic human resources officer at the school. Before moving to academic administration, she worked at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Boston as an executive assistant team leader. After graduating from Stanford University with a bachelor’s degree in sociology, with a specialization in organizational behavior, she worked at several nonprofits in the San Francisco area before heading overseas to live in Italy and Morocco.

Glenn McCune, a police sergeant at the Cummings School, along with officers Patricia Bathgate, Andrew Fyvie, Jason Kirby, Karen Melican and Brett Morava, received the Cummings School Exceptional Service Team Award in August. The awards were given to faculty and staff nominated by their colleagues for their dedication and enthusiasm and for the positive effects they have had on the Tufts community.

Brendan McMullen, assistant professor of environmental and population health at the Tufts Ambulatory Service, received a 2010 Cummings School Exceptional Service Award in August. The awards were given to individuals nominated by their colleagues for their dedication and enthusiasm and for the positive effects they have had on the Tufts community.

Dawn Meola, senior research technician in the Department of Clinical Sciences at the Cummings School, received a 2010 Cummings School Exceptional Service Award in August. The awards were given to individuals nominated by their colleagues for their dedication and enthusiasm and for the positive effects they have had at Tufts.

Gilbert Metcalf, a professor of economics in the School of Arts and Sciences, had his recent work featured in a story in MIT News, “Financial Impacts of ‘Cap and Trade.’ ”

Sheila Moffat, manager of the Department of Environmental and Population Health at the Cummings School, received a 2010 Cummings School Exceptional Service Award in August. The awards were given to individuals nominated by their colleagues for their dedication and enthusiasm and for the positive effects they have had at Tufts.

Ben Nephew, a research assistant professor at the Cummings School, and Bob Bridges, professor of biomedical sciences, co-authored an abstract titled “Effects of Chronic Stress During Lactation on Maternal Rats and Pups,” which Bridges presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology in Toronto in June.

Rachel Peters has been appointed an assistant professor in the pathology section in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the Cummings School. Peters is a board-certified pathologist who previously worked at Cornell University. She will be performing diagnostic services, training residents and teaching students.

Dominique Penninck, professor of clinical sciences at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, attended the EVDI (European Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging) meeting in July in Giessen, Germany. As president of EVDI, Penninck presided at both the board meeting and the annual general meeting. He presented a seminar on ultrasonography of the pancreas in small animals (and practice labs), and was also the keynote speaker, talking on “Imaging the GI Tract: Where Are We and Where Do We Go?”

Jean Poteete, senior campus planner at the Cummings School, received a 2010 Cummings School Exceptional Service Award in August. The awards were given to individuals nominated by their colleagues for their dedication and enthusiasm and for the positive effects they have had on campus.

Genevieve Rajewski joined Tufts Publications on August 31 as editor of Tufts Veterinary Medicine, the magazine of the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. She is based on the third floor of the Administration Building on the Grafton campus, and works two and a half days a week. Rajewski’s work has appeared in Smithsonian, Washington Post Magazine, Wired.com, the Christian Science Monitor and the Boston Globe. For the past three years, she has been the director of communications at the Boston Society of Architects, where she managed a team of three in producing a 16-page bimonthly newsletter, several electronic newsletters and web content, as well as leading the BSA’s social networking and media relations efforts.

Joyce Sackey, dean for multicultural affairs and global health at the School of Medicine, has been selected as an honoree for the upcoming Rx for Excellence Awards. The event is hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Law Report, and will be held September 24 in Boston.

Ken Shadlen, a senior research fellow at the Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE), gave two lectures at the Universidad de los Andes in Bogotá, Colombia, in early August. The first was “La política de propiedad intelectual y desarrollo: Conocimiento, patentes, y comercio en perspectiva histórica” (The Politics of Intellectual Property and Development: Knowledge, Patents and Trade in Historical Perspective). The second was “Patentes, industrias farmacéuticas, y políticas de salud e innovación en América Latina” (Patents, Pharmaceutical Industries and Health and Innovation Policies in Latin America). He was hosted by the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Development (CIDER) at the Universidad de los Andes.

Timothy A. Wise, director of the research and policy program at the Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE), planned to present his paper “Agricultural Dumping under NAFTA” on September 1 at a seminar at Mexico’s National Autonomous University and on September 7 to a national meeting of farm leaders affiliated with ANEC, one of Mexico’s leading national farm organizations. Wise also chaired a GDAE panel on “The World Trading System in the Wake of the Financial Crisis” and planned to present on agricultural trade liberalization in the wake of the food price crisis in Geneva for the World Trade Organization’s annual public forum in September.

Qiaobing Xu joined the School of Engineering as an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in September. He earned a bachelor’s degree in polymer engineering and science and a master’s degree in chemistry from Jilin University in China. He completed his Ph.D. in chemistry with George Whitesides at Harvard in 2007, where he invented nanoskiving, a novel fabrication technique used to produce nanomaterials. He most recently worked as a postdoctoral researcher at MIT with Robert Langer, holding the MIT-Harvard Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Postdoctoral Fellowship. His research interests include microtechnology and nanotechnology, tissue engineering and drug delivery.

Submit your People Note to Tufts Journal editor Taylor McNeil by the third Thursday of the month.

Posted September 03, 2010